The deaths of classical music

The deaths of classical music

Classical music has lived beyond many of its deaths. But some people believe that it won’t survive the next one, i.e., the death of its audience, which, truth be told, has been dying for a few decades now.

Just out is a thought-provoking essay on the death of the classical music audience by Anna Goldsworthy. Goldsworthy is a classical pianist and her essay is titled “The Lost Art of Listening: Has Classical Music Become Irrelevant?” Here’s a taste:

Reports of the death of classical music are not new. There are those who have made a career out of eulogising it, such as the English journalist Norman Lebrecht, who has written the same book on the subject several times; the late pianist and musicologist Charles Rosen quipped that “the death of classical music is perhaps its oldest continuing tradition”. Classical music has absorbed a number of deaths already – the death of patronage, of the composer-virtuoso, of tonality. Clearly it is made of stern stuff, but can it survive the death of its audience?

Go here to read the whole thing at The Monthly.